Randy Rogers Band Hits New High-Water Mark With Hellbent

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Recorded in Nashville, Hellbent revisits and refines the band's acclaimed brand of road-tested country music

A "perpetual live favorite" — Rolling Stone

"Country music based in the genre’s rich outlaw tradition" — New York Times

"A love letter to the Texas community that birthed them" — Garden & Gun

San Marcos, TX  (Apr. 25, 2019) — Randy Rogers Band will release the band's eighth studio album, Hellbent, this Friday, April 26th, and the timing couldn't be better. 

Produced by Grammy-winner Dave Cobb and recorded at Nashville's historic RCA Studio A, Hellbent shines new light on the camaraderie, chemistry, and Texas-sized country hooks that have made RandyRogers Band a must-see live act for nearly two decades. The guys will celebrate their 20th anniversary in October 2020, and it's that kind of family-like familiarity — sharpened by thousands of shows in dancehalls, honky tonks, theaters, and beyond — that makes Hellbent so appealing. This isn't just a band. It's a group of road warriors and honorary brothers. A tightly-knit group whose popularity has been built show by show, mile by mile, song by song. Hellbent celebrates that drive and determination, while also pointing the band toward another decade of acclaimed, homegrown country music. 

A "perpetual live favorite" (Rolling Stone) playing "country music based in the genre’s rich outlaw tradition" (New York Times), Randy Rogers Band recorded Hellbent during a typically busy period that found the group playing sold-out shows from coast to coast. In 2018 alone, they performed to more than 60,000 fans outside of their native Texas. Their unique popularity isn't limited to the stage, either. The guys racked up 97 million plays on Pandora last year, all while maintaining their independence as a band.  

"The guys were amazing to work with. They came in ready and open to ideas. They’ve been together a while so we found a groove and made what I think is a great record that captures who they are," says Dave Cobb. 

Packed with original material, Hellbent has already been lauded by publications like Rolling StoneGarden & Gun, and Billboard. On "Hell Bent on a Heartache," Rogers and company put their unique stamp on a song co-written by Guy Clark, Morgane Stapleton, and Chris Stapleton. Meanwhile, they nod to their roots with the nostalgic "Comal County Line," a crowd favorite that's been praised by Garden & Gun as "a love letter to the Texas community that birthed them."

Never content to stay at home for very long (and much of the reason for titling this album Hellbent), Randy Rogers Band will tour heavily again this year in support of the new 11-track album. 

The group will also celebrate Hellbent's release by visiting three locally-owned record stores in their home state — Chief Records in Fort Worth, Good Records in Dallas, and Cactus Records in Houston — during the album's first weekend of availability, giving intimate acoustic performances and signing albums in each location. Additional dates for Randy Rogers Band's ongoing tour can be found here.

The Hellbent track listing is below:
1. Drinking Money
2. I’ll Never Get Over You 
3. Anchors Away
4. Comal County Line
5. Hell Bent On A Heartache 
6. You, Me, And A Bottle
7. We Never Made It To Mexico
8. Crazy People 
9. Fire In The Hole
10. Wine In A Coffee Cup 
11. Good One Coming On

In-Store Album Signings

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Randy Rogers Band will be making in-store appearances at record stores across Texas beginning Saturday, April 27-Monday, April 29. Stop by and grab your vinyl copy of their brand new record #Hellbent + get it signed. Details below!

April 27 - 12:00pm - Waterloo Records - Austin, TX *Signing Only

April 28 - 12:00pm - Chief Records - Fort Worth, TX *Acoustic Performance + Signing

April 28 - 5:00pm - Good Records - Dallas, TX *Acoustic Performance + Signing with priority admittance for in-store purchasers

April 29 - 5:30pm - Cactus Music - Houston, TX *Acoustic Performance + Signing

Billboard: Randy Rogers Band Reinvents Guy Clark's 'Hell Bent On a Heartache': Exclusive

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Randy Rogers Band won’t release their forthcoming album Hellbent until April 26, but that’s not stopping the Texas act from giving fans an early listen. Their eighth studio album borrows its title from Guy Clark’s “Hell Bent On a Heartache,” which the band covers on their upcoming project and Billboard premieres below.

Hear “Hell Bent On a Heartache” from the new album Hellbent, available April 26 by clicking here.

Hear “Comal County Line,” a New Song from Randy Rogers Band

“If it wasn’t for Texas, there would be no Randy Rogers Band,” jokes the band’s frontman, and while Rogers is mostlymaking a wry George Strait reference, it’s also the truth. For Rogers and his bandmates, it all started in Lone Star State dives and dance halls, and their ceaseless touring over the last two decades has built an army of die-hard fans. Their new Dave Cobb-produced album, Hellbent, out April 26, capitalizes on the chemistry of those live shows—”Crazy People” is a nod to Rogers’s conservative upbringing, and the Guy Clark cover “Hell Bent on a Heartache” seems destined to become a set-list staple.

Meanwhile, “Comal County Line,” which G&G is excited to exclusively premiere, is a love letter to the Texas community that birthed them. “Being on the road, I missed home so bad,” says Rogers, who penned the track with fellow country songwriter Sean McConnell. “On those long bus rides, time just drags on and on and on. ‘Comal County Line’ was about going back to where we live, and where we love.” Read the full article and listen to our song “Comal County Line at GardenandGun.com.

Click here to pre-order our upcoming album Hellbent out April 26!

Hear Randy Rogers Band’s Rugged New Song ‘Crazy People’

Country group’s new Dave Cobb-produced album ‘Hellbent’ will be released April 26th

Randy Rogers lets his imagination run wild while looking back on a straight-laced upbringing in “Crazy People,” the loping new single from his band’s upcoming LPHellbent.

Though written by Brad Clawson, Jamie Paulin, and Will Weatherly, “Crazy People” hits close to home for Rogers, who had a devout upbringing in the small town of Cleburne, Texas, outside Fort Worth. Against a sawing fiddle, he juxtaposes childhood memories of the outside world with his mother’s admonitions to pay other peoples’ sinful ways no mind — but then stumbles across an old photo box that changes his perspective on his parents.

From his adult perspective, Rogers can identify with both realities, having also grown into the life of the “heartbreaking, money wasting, hell raising, crazy people” of the song’s chorus. “As the son of a preacher, I lived this song word for word. And yes, I’m a little crazy too,” he tells Rolling Stone Country. Read full article and hear “Crazy People” on RollingStone.com!

Click here to pre-order our upcoming album Hellbent out April 26!

Inside Robert Earl Keen, Randy Rogers’ Fictional Stryker Brothers Duo

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The idea started with a brush fire, but before long it took on a life of its own. Two lives, in fact: Coal and Flynt Stryker, a pair of mysterious siblings who died in a prison fire, leaving behind a batch of long-lost country recordings. Except that they didn’t. Cole and Flynt never even existed. The Stryker Brothers were nothing more than an excuse for Robert Earl Keen and Randy Rogers to make an album together.

So why did they go to all the trouble?

“I thought it was just funny and cool and interesting. Let’s have a little mystery in life,” says Keen, sitting with Rogers in a soundproof control room backstage at ACL Live in Austin, Texas, one afternoon in December. He’s splayed out sideways in his chair, as though he’s discovered a new plane of comfort at this absurd angle. “It’s surprising how many people were like, ‘Now, what’s going on?’ If you have to explain it to ’em, it’s kind of like having to explain a joke.”

Keen and Rogers are preparing to take the stage for the first — and as far as they know, only — time as the Stryker Brothers. And they likely never expected to get this far. Since they started writing the 13 songs that became Burn Band, released last September, they constructed an elaborate backstory, had friends like Todd Snider, Bruce Robison and Shooter Jennings lie about it on video, and even brought an astronaut with them to tonight’s show. But none of that was the plan when they started. Read the full article at RollingStone.com.